Top 12 States for Homesteading

The Top 12 U.S. States for Homesteading

Nadia Tamara A Little Bit of Everything, Homesteading


Top 12 US States for Homesteading

Homesteading is defined by a lifestyle of self sufficiency. In an age where technology does most of our thinking, many people are considering changing their ways and living off the land as many of our ancestors did years ago.

Off-grid living is not for everybody because of the amount of physical effort and time that it requires to make everything work. It’s a process of learning to grow your own food, raise animals, create your own energy and waste disposal systems, and make anything else you need to survive. For those who didn’t grow up in a farm-like environment, this will be a huge learning curve. At the same time, a lot of peace comes in knowing that you don’t have to rely on someone else for your survival nor your food. It pulls us out of the rat race and helps us live organically.

Homesteading is also not necessarily an individual endeavor. Although some people can live alone for months on end, humans were not created to live in solitary confinement. Many homesteaders create communities with their “neighbors” even if they live miles away from each other.

Thousands of people are migrating to the countryside and turning to this way of living. A good reason to become self-sufficient is because many people spend hours in front of a computer and less time with their family. Their countless hours of work does no more than to provide food for the table and cover the bills, so why not invest that time in making your own food and learning new skills that your family can also participate in? It’s becoming a more authentic way to live, for those who are tired of technology running every part of their lives.


What are the best homesteading conditions?


Many factors can influence your decision on where to settle in for your off-grid journey. Consider what your priorities are in becoming self-reliant. Are you looking to disappear off the map completely or do you still want to live somewhat near the rest of civilization? Do you want to buy a cheap property with lots of acreage? Or do you want to grow your food in the most favorable conditions? Answering these questions first will help you narrow down on a state that best meets your wants and needs.

There is not one state that provides everything we could possibly want, otherwise all the homesteaders would probably move there! We will have to give up some desires in exchange for some benefits.


Consider these important factors:


  • Friendly state laws: Most states offer homesteading laws but some are more favorable than others in terms of protection during times of hardship. This is a great resource to help you determine which state has the friendliest homesteading protection laws.
     
  • The cost of the land: Don’t be immediately fooled by low property costs. Some states have cheap land but expensive property taxes. Based on the cost of the estate you want to purchase, you can determine if you’re able to afford it once you take into account of all the taxes that will get added to it. Every state is also different in regards to homestead exemptions which may reduce your property taxes. Usually the state will deduct a percentage of the property’s value.

  • Safety of the land: These are some helpful links to help you narrow down what areas are environmentally safe and which ones aren’t in terms of: drought, superfund sites, fracking and oil refineries at risk.

  • Water accessibility: Some states are known for having an abundance of water, such as rivers and lakes, whereas others are known for their consistently dry climates. Look for areas that receive generous amounts of rainfall each year. State water laws will vary, probably due to the amount of water that is available in that state. You need water to survive so make sure to research the water and rain catchment laws in the states you’re considering to homestead in.

  • Growing food: The main dream for many homesteaders is having the space and freedom to grow their own food. Not only is this healthier than buying it at the store but homegrown always tastes better.

    Make sure that the place you’re looking to settle into has a climate that has lots of potential in growing food. In temperate climates you can grow crops for ten months or more. Research the types of crops you want to grow and if the climate will work in your favor. For colder winter climates, building a greenhouse might also be a possibility.

    Look into the laws that might affect the raising of livestock, as each state could be different.

  • Homeschooling children: If you plan to raise your family in the countryside, you may need to homeschool them. Visit this page to read about the homeschooling laws in each state.

  • The community: As previously mentioned, homesteaders build communities wherever they go. It’s important to research communities instead of just surveying the land before you decide to buy it. Whatever your political and religious views are, you will find yourself at greater peace to live within a community that shares similar values. Fitting in amongst the members of community will serve as a huge advantage to you.

  • Climate: Something to definitely consider is the climate of the town you’re planning to move to. Find a place where the seasons will suit you. Some people love experiencing all four seasons and others, myself included, prefer warmer weather all-year.

  • You and your family’s health: Health is something extremely important to consider. I do believe that living off the land will improve your health dramatically because you will be eating less produce with pesticides and considerably less processed foods. On the other hand, if you live very secluded from civilization your chances of getting to a medical professional quickly in an emergency are unlikely. If you have children and/or pre-existing medical conditions, consider living in a rural town that has a nearby hospital.

  • Beautiful landscapes: If you’re going to be in an off-grid location, you might as well enjoy the view. Every state has its unique beauty and resources. Picking a homesteading location based on landscape depends on what kind of scenery you prefer.


You can make homesteading work in almost every state if you are determined enough to do it.

Thoroughly researching and getting a feel for the rural town you’re considering to settle in will open your mind to the advantages and disadvantages that are present there. No place is going to be perfect and every place will offer a different set of challenges, but overcoming those challenges is part of the fun in living off the grid, is it not? It’ll make a big difference in your experience if you know what to expect before you settle in there permanently.

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Top 12 homesteading states


These are the states I consider to be the best for homesteading in the United States.


12. Alaska


Alaska Homestead

Alaska is a completely solitary state where it becomes a true relationship between you and the wilderness. Some locations are so remote that you can only arrive by plane. I’m not necessarily suggesting going that far but if pure solitude is what you’re looking for, there’s no better place than this. This longed-for peace comes at a price because the winters are very harsh and demanding.

It’s probably a good idea to spend a year living in Alaska before deciding to move there full time. People that are not used to the change in climate often underestimate the struggles they will later face surviving the winter. It would also help to talk to the locals who have spent their entire lives under those harsh conditions and can surely offer you offer you better advice than anyone else.


11. Wyoming


Wyoming Homestead

Wyoming will give you the feel that you’re living in the early time of the settlers or cowboys. The small population and wide open spaces is perfect for those who are seeking solitude. It’s a very diverse state offering resources in ranching and farming, although homesteading hasn’t completely caught on just yet.

The negative thing about Wyoming is the harsh winters which can make the growing season short and difficult. This is a state where you’re probably gonna want to build a green house.


10. Arizona


Arizona Homestead

Arizona lies in a desert and growing your food here will be a challenge but it's not impossible. In terms of buying cheap land it’s the best choice out of all 50 states. If you’re on a homesteading budget look no further but first, check with the local city laws that you can build your dream self-sustainable home. Some laws could be strict depending on what you’re envisioning to create.

Also it’s wise to gain some insight into the kind of food that can be grown in hot climates. Not only can the heat become unbearable during the peak summer months but naturally it’s a place that is more susceptible to droughts. You will have to get creative with rain catchment systems and other resources to save plenty of water for yourself and your crops.


9. Montana


Montana Homestead

Montana is one of the most visually appealing places to live, especially near the Rocky Mountains. For many, it’s a homesteading haven. The summers are beautiful and the winters are harsh, making the growing season short and possibly rough. Many accept this challenge as an opportunity to expand their creativity in their endeavor of becoming self-sufficient.


8. Maine


Maine Homestead

Maine has incredible landscapes, scenery and plenty of open land to start your off-grid living. The northern part of Maine is less populated so it’s an ideal place for those who want to enjoy solitude living and low property taxes. You can enjoy all four seasons there and still grow crops if you can learn to use the climate changes to your advantage.


7. Connecticut


Connecticut Homestead

Connecticut is small-farm and homestead friendly but unfortunately property taxes are higher than most states so the start-up costs are outrageously high for most people. The benefits, other than the picture-perfect scenery you will find throughout the rural parts, is that water is clean and plentiful, the climate is typically mild, and there’s lots of farming and agricultural potential.

You may need to work the land a bit to lighten the rocky terrain but your efforts will be worth it. Connecticut is also homeschooling-friendly, so if you’re looking for a place to raise and homeschool your children, this may be the state for you!


6. Michigan


Michigan Homestead

Michigan is a diverse state which offers the experience of all four seasons although winters may feel longer than the other three seasons. The soil is fertile and rich making it a wonderful place to grow crops, during a short part of the year. It’s probably a good idea to look into building a green house.Lake Michigan also provides the ability to fish for trout and salmon.

There are many homesteaders in Michigan so you are sure to find many like-minded people. Most people that live in Michigan love it there, even though the higher cost of living and the strict state regulations are forcing some people to migrate to states like Missouri.


5. Missouri


Missouri Homestead

Missouri is a very homesteading-friendly state. There are fewer state government regulations which provides people with more freedoms to live the way they want to on their property. It’s such a diverse state that anyone is sure to find a place they can enjoy. Sounds like a dream, right?

It’s also legal to collect rain in this state which typically gets an average of 40 inches of rain per year! In Missouri you may not feel the extremes of the four seasons but you’ll get a taste of them for sure. Summers are typically hot and humid and winters are warmer than some may like although on occasion you may get snow. The bonus is that you will reap the benefits of a successful crop harvest!


4. Oregon


Oregon Homestead

Oregon has beautiful scenery and provides a strong community of thriving homesteaders and small farm owners. The state has favorable water rights and offers versatile climates giving you options as to where you want to live. Oregon is known for its farmer’s markets, which should be enough to tell you that it’s easy and beneficial to grow good crops there. Coastal Oregon is one of the highest naturally abundant places in the United States.


3. West Virginia


West Virginia Homestead

West Virginia offers a great place for self-sustainability due to its diverse yet favorable climate. With an approximate 44 inches of rain per year, you wouldn’t have to worry about not having enough water to tend to your land, crops and personal needs. West Virginia is perfect for their low property taxes but zoning restrictions in rural properties are becoming more strict so the sooner you buy land there, the better.


2. Tennessee


Tennessee Homestead

The rural parts of Tennessee offer some of the most beautiful homesteading locations in the United States. In Tennessee you will have the pleasure of fully experiencing every season while obtaining a plentiful harvest for about nine months out of the year. Tennessee has a lot to offer in terms of low property costs and taxes, favorable state laws, and growing your own food. The state government allows people to collect rainwater and offers many other freedoms for what you can do on your property.

For more information about homesteading in Tennessee, check out this blog!


1. Idaho


Idaho Homestead

Idaho is the state with some of the best soil in the country, making it my top choice for homesteading. The state is beautifully green with hills and mountain sides. If you like living away from people but not too far that you’re completely isolated, this is the perfect location for you! Plus, the government laws are pretty favorable too!

For more information about homesteading in Idaho, check out this blog!


Did your favorite state not get ranked?


I'm sure some of you are surprised that many of the major farming states are not mentioned under the top 12.

If you don't see your state listed here, don't get discouraged! It doesn't mean that homesteading there would be a bad option altogether, but I encourage you to really look into what the state has to offer to see if it's a good fit for you.


Interested in homesteading in Pennsylvania?Read more about that here!

In Conclusion


Choosing the ideal homestead location depends on your needs, wants and likes. One out of the fifty U.S. states will surely have what you’re looking for. Narrow down your list starting with the states that meet your needs, and go from there. Once you have an idea of what state might be a good match for you, research all your questions and make sure you have a clear understanding before making a final decision. It might help to take a road trip and explore the state in person and get to know the locals in the rural towns.

My best recommendation for those of you who are serious about starting your homesteading journey is to inform yourself as much as you can prior to moving off the grid. The internet has a vast amount of information and most of it is available to us for free.

Living off the land and off the grid was not easy for the pioneers and it most likely won’t be easy for us either, especially if we have little notion to the demands that homesteading has. The idea of growing our own food and becoming self-reliant comes at a huge price but an even bigger reward. Don’t be discouraged by what hardships you might encounter. The majority of families who started homesteading wouldn’t trade their lifestyle for anything else in the world. If it’s in your heart, I think you should pursue it. But I also think you should go about it wisely.

Thanks to the resources we have available at our fingertips, we can become equipped to succeed in the midst of difficulties.

I wish you a successful endeavor in your journey towards self-sufficiency.

Happy homesteading!

Have you moved to the countryside and built your own off-grid estate?
If so, I'd love to hear about your experience in the comments below.


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